Mission
The National Research Center on Rural Education Support (NRCRES) was established in 2004 with funding from the Institute for Educational Sciences of the U.S. Department of Education. This center is based at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

NRCRES has conducted a focused program of research that addresses significant problems in rural education. More than 40% of all American schools are in rural areas and 30% of all students attend rural schools. The research and development work of NRCRES sought solutions to improve the quality of rural education, including the following issues:

  • retention of qualified teachers
  • student achievement and dropout
  • availability of and access to opportunities for Advanced Placement courses
  • improvement in teacher quality through professional development



Research Programs
The NRCRES has conducted four research programs to help address the issues faced in rural education.

More information about each research program can be found in the Research Programs section.

Supporting Rural Schools and Communities Research Conference

The Supporting Rural Schools and Communities Research Conference was held November 5-6, 2009 on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus. Conference information and PowerPoint presentations are available here.

Special Journal Issues Highlighting NRCRES Findings

Journal of Youth and Adolescence

Special Issue:
Developmental Challenges and Adaptation of Rural Adolescents
Volume 40(9), September, 2011
Guest Editors Thomas W. Farmer, David Estell, and Jill V. Hamm

This special issue investigates the development and adaptation of adolescents growing-up in rural communities. Articles address a wide range of challenges experienced by rural youth including issues pertaining to poverty, changing economic and demographic characteristics, social and behavioral difficulties, risk behaviors, educational and career attainment, and preparation for entry into the workforce and adult life. Drawing from scholars in Education, Community Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Public Health, and Sociology, the articles consider the influences of various ecological contexts, including family, peer, school, neighborhood, and/or cultural and ethnic factors, on critical adjustment experiences of rural youth.

Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology

Special Issue:
Teachers and Classroom Social Dynamics
Volume 32(5), September 2011
Guest Editors Thomas W. Farmer, Meghan McAuliffe Lines, and Jill V. Hamm

This special issue investigates the key role of teachers as an "invisible hand" in shaping school social dynamics at the elementary and middle-grade levels. Articles from this combination of scholars in education, human development, and psychology address the roles of teacher-student interactions and teacher familiarity with peer interactions within the classroom and school setting, and their effects on constructs such as school belonging, prosocial or aggressive behavior, and academic self-efficacy.

 

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